“Making science a cornerstone” of rebuilt Ukraine

New funding programs to support early-career researchers, cross-appointments with Western universities and infrastructure replacement must be at the heart of a post-war plan to revive Europe’s ailing research system. Ukraine, leading scientific organizations said.

In a letter signed by representatives of national science academies in the United States and several European countries, agreed following a meeting in Warsaw earlier this month, world leaders are urged to develop grants and programs to support the “reconstruction of a modern and integrated science and science on a global scale”. research system.

« Rebuilding science and research in Ukraine [will be] essential to ensure its long-term prosperity and sovereignty,” said the letterwhich is signed by the National Academy of Sciences of the United States, the Royal Society of the United Kingdom and similar organizations in Germany, Poland, Denmark and Poland.

Among the “practical steps” outlined in a 10-point plan are “specific funding programs for early career Ukrainian researchers and their teams, including those using remote working arrangements,” and “establishing[ing] fund joint research programs by international teams with researchers working in Ukraine and provide for joint appointments”.

The plan calls on Western universities to allow displaced Ukrainian scholars to “maintain their institutional affiliations in Ukraine.” [when] to receive temporary appointments abroad, in order to encourage repatriation once hostilities cease and the general situation improves”.

It asks European and American universities to “provide access to specialized research facilities abroad, in particular those that replicate Ukrainian facilities damaged or destroyed during the hostilities”, as well as to “donate laboratory equipment and essential and still usable research to Ukrainian institutions to replace the capacities destroyed during the war”.

The letter also asks publishers to waive article processing fees for Ukrainian scholars, as well as to provide free access to journals to institutions in Ukraine, which some journal providers have already implemented. Meanwhile, scientific organizations are urged to waive membership dues and conference attendance fees.

More broadly, the academics call on institutions to “establish brain circulation measures for Ukrainian researchers for networking and mutual learning with colleagues and organizations in the international scientific community.”

They also call for the creation of a “coordinating council to maximize impacts, minimize redundancies and meaningfully use synergies, taking into account issues related to junior and senior researchers”.

write in ScienceJerzy Duszyński, who heads the Polish National Academy of Sciences, Marcia McNutt of the US National Academy of Sciences, and Anatoliy Zagorodny, president of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, explain how the Russian invasion had, in many cases, deliberately sought “to destroy the nation’s scientific institutions and infrastructure, signaling Russia’s intent to destroy Ukraine’s future”.

“It is vital that science be the cornerstone of any reconstruction of Ukraine after the war,” they add, stating that “the reconstruction of Ukrainian science should not focus on reproducing what has been lost , but on equipping the country’s scientific enterprise to meet common 21st century challenges — such as preparing for future pandemics, tackling climate change, and sharing the benefits of science fairly and equitably.

New funding programs to support early-career researchers, cross-appointments with Western universities and infrastructure replacement must be at the heart of a post-war plan to revive Europe’s ailing research system. Ukraine, leading scientific organizations said.

In a letter signed by representatives of national science academies in the United States and several European countries, agreed following a meeting in Warsaw earlier this month, world leaders are urged to develop grants and programs to support the “reconstruction of a modern and integrated science and science on a global scale”. research system.

« Rebuilding science and research in Ukraine [will be] essential to ensure its long-term prosperity and sovereignty,” said the letterwhich is signed by the National Academy of Sciences of the United States, the Royal Society of the United Kingdom and similar organizations in Germany, Poland, Denmark and Poland.

Among the “practical steps” outlined in a 10-point plan are “specific funding programs for early career Ukrainian researchers and their teams, including those using remote working arrangements,” and “establishing[ing] fund joint research programs by international teams with researchers working in Ukraine and provide for joint appointments”.

The plan calls on Western universities to allow displaced Ukrainian scholars to “maintain their institutional affiliations in Ukraine.” [when] to receive temporary appointments abroad, in order to encourage repatriation once hostilities cease and the general situation improves”.

It asks European and American universities to “provide access to specialized research facilities abroad, in particular those that replicate Ukrainian facilities damaged or destroyed during the hostilities”, as well as to “donate laboratory equipment and essential and still usable research to Ukrainian institutions to replace the capacities destroyed during the war”.

The letter also asks publishers to waive article processing fees for Ukrainian scholars, as well as to provide free access to journals to institutions in Ukraine, which some journal providers have already implemented. Meanwhile, scientific organizations are urged to waive membership dues and conference attendance fees.

More broadly, the academics call on institutions to “establish brain circulation measures for Ukrainian researchers for networking and mutual learning with colleagues and organizations in the international scientific community.”

They also call for the creation of a “coordinating council to maximize impacts, minimize redundancies and meaningfully use synergies, taking into account issues related to junior and senior researchers”.

write in ScienceJerzy Duszyński, who heads the Polish National Academy of Sciences, Marcia McNutt of the US National Academy of Sciences, and Anatoliy Zagorodny, president of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, explain how the Russian invasion had, in many cases, deliberately sought “to destroy the nation’s scientific institutions and infrastructure, signaling Russia’s intent to destroy Ukraine’s future”.

“It is vital that science be the cornerstone of any reconstruction of Ukraine after the war,” they add, stating that “the reconstruction of Ukrainian science should not focus on reproducing what has been lost , but on equipping the country’s scientific enterprise to meet common 21st century challenges — such as preparing for future pandemics, tackling climate change, and sharing the benefits of science fairly and equitably.

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