Atlantic Storm http://atlantic-storm.org/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 07:06:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://atlantic-storm.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Atlantic Storm http://atlantic-storm.org/ 32 32 Blue industrial laser brings speed, quality and efficiency to metal 3D printing https://atlantic-storm.org/blue-industrial-laser-brings-speed-quality-and-efficiency-to-metal-3d-printing/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 04:03:28 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/blue-industrial-laser-brings-speed-quality-and-efficiency-to-metal-3d-printing/

When the first commercially available blue industrial laser shipped over five years ago, it began to transform materials processing applications. Its rapid adoption followed, based on the fact that all metals absorb blue light much better than infrared (IR) light, especially copper, aluminum and gold, all of which are highly reflective in IR. . This fundamental physical advantage leads directly to improved performance for metal processing applications. It first impacted welding, where better light absorption leads directly to improved welding speed and part quality. The blue laser now brings these same advantages to additive manufacturing.

Additive manufacturing began as a method of producing prototype parts from plastics and other polymers. While useful for verifying form, fit and function, this limited range of materials dictates an equally limited range of applications. It is only with the extension of additive manufacturing to the manufacture of metal parts that the applications can be extended. Industrial blue laser technology has now advanced to allow integration into laser-based metal 3D printing methods such as direct energy deposition (DED) and powder bed fusion (PBF).

Additive manufacturing presents unique challenges that the blue laser is designed to overcome. For example, the manufacturing speed, efficiency and quality of blue laser 3D printing opens up the possibility of mass production. Advances in laser technology and additive manufacturing processes will drive growth and enable new applications.

A foundation in fundamental physics

The electronic structure of metal atoms dictates their interaction with electromagnetic radiation. For a wide range of reflective metals – copper, aluminum, gold and others – their inherent atomic structure makes them very poor absorbers of infrared radiation. Therefore, very high IR power densities are required to initiate even energy transfer in metals. At low IR power density, the IR light is simply reflected from the surface.

As the power density increases, the beam forms a hole in the part, with infrared radiation reflecting off the sides of the hole several times, resulting in a dramatic increase in absorption. This dramatic increase leads to a runaway condition, with increased absorption resulting in violent vaporization, creating voids and spatter which results in a poor quality weld. Conversely, as shown in Figure 1, these same metals absorb blue light very well. Therefore, melting reflective metals with blue laser energy is a smooth and well-controlled process.

For an application like welding, the objective is to achieve a mechanically (and sometimes electrically) robust joint, characterized by an even and continuous weld. With the precise process control offered by the blue laser, a wide selection of speed, spot size, beam energy and other parameters will produce a high quality weld. This means that different combinations of metals, thicknesses and part geometries can be accommodated. In contrast, with the IR laser, the window for these process parameters is extremely narrow, which not only limits productivity, but is sometimes so narrow that it is impossible to achieve a high quality weld using an IR laser.

Additive metal manufacturing is essentially sequential welding done on a small scale. Raw material is presented and an energy source melts the raw material, joining it to adjacent material. Laser-based additive manufacturing is attractive for the same reasons that lasers are optimal solutions in many applications: they deliver energy flexibly and reliably to a precise location without requiring physical contact between the laser and the material. DED and PBF are alternative approaches to presenting the raw material. The DED, for example, directs the raw material to the laser printhead, while the PBF lays down an even layer of powdered material over which the laser travels in a specified pattern.

The same fundamental physics of welding applies: poor absorption of reflective metals such as copper, gold, and aluminum presents IR laser additive manufacturing with two challenges. First, when fusing reflective materials with a high intensity IR laser beam, there is a substantial amount of vaporization of the smaller powder particles, leading to the need to manage the redeposition of these vaporized particles.

Second, if you are using a ring laser, a significant amount of energy is wasted preheating the powder in front of the higher brightness laser source.

Blue light is predictably absorbed by most metals, so a low-light laser can be used to create a well-controlled fusion puddle and vaporization can be minimized. This provides a way to expand multilaser systems without having to resort to complex gas flow management schemes. Therefore, blue lasers can provide high part densities, higher print speeds, and a way to increase production speeds with multiple parallel lasers. As shown in Figure 2, the blue laser produces 3D printed metal parts of equivalent density more efficiently than infrared sources.

Beyond Theory

While fundamental physics is a necessary component for industrial blue laser success in materials processing applications, realizing the promise requires real-world engineering. Early blue laser performance tests in DED and PBF machines demonstrate the tangible benefits of blue over IR. For example, copper blocks made with both methods achieved a density greater than 97% and showed excellent surface quality and dimensional accuracy, while stainless steel test coupons had a minimum density of 98%, all before process optimization.

Representative quantitative improvements of blue versus IR are summarized in Figure 3. The key build rate efficiency metric – essentially a measure of build rate per watt – was also found to be 1 .4X to over 7X better than IR. These advantages are consistent for stainless steel, titanium, copper and the GrCop alloy, and demonstrate the basis for growth in additional application areas.

Specifically, IR printing of highly reflective materials such as gold, pure copper, or aluminum is slow and IR lasers struggle with print quality. The blue laser is opening up applications in jewelry, dentistry, and medical implants, and the benefits of the blue laser extend to printing gold and manufacturing pure copper parts such as those required for components in aerospace and electric vehicles. For example, Figure 4 shows a representative 3D printed part – a scaled down version of a rocket engine nozzle, including the complex internal cooling channels. Higher speed, coupled with better throttle management, will democratize 3D printing for mass-produced parts and lead to wider adoption of 3D printing.

Current Capabilities, Future Possibilities

Since its introduction in 2017, blue industrial laser specifications have rapidly improved. Obtaining key measurements for power and brightness has expanded the scope of applications. Early designs excelled in battery cell manufacturing applications, where dozens or dozens of thin sheets needed to be joined with good mechanical strength and uncompromising electrical fidelity.

Building on this early success, as the blue laser reached higher levels of output power – breaking the 500 W and then 1000 W milestones – its range of applications also expanded. For example, it has become possible to join battery sheets, tabs, busbars and enclosures with a single laser system. Additional advancements allowed the laser to be integrated into standard industrial scanning systems, introducing efficiencies that enabled fast, high-quality throughput for consumer electronics applications. These applications, in turn, have spurred the development of assembly processes for electric vehicle components, as well as aerospace and medical applications. Until now, laser improvements and process developments have happened in parallel, and this trend will certainly continue with additive manufacturing.

We anticipate that much of the development in automotive and similar applications will focus on process optimization to further improve the efficiency of volumetric printing. The blue laser technology being developed today will greatly support the future expansion of additive manufacturing by delivering higher print speeds, with high resolution and quality. Higher luminosity blue lasers will directly impact today’s 3D printers by providing a plug-and-play replacement for IR lasers, resulting in an immediate improvement in performance and material extent that can be printed. Figure 5 shows the simple integration of a blue laser into a commercial 3D printer.

Rapid and steady improvement

The next leap in industrial blue laser capabilities will come with surface printing, which is a very promising technology but still in the early stages of development – a development that NUBURU is pursuing under a demonstration contract from the US Air Force. Parallel continuous improvement of blue laser and optimization of parameters for processes such as surface printing will face the same challenges as any new technological development. Improving technical performance is key to growing applications for any new product, but logistics must also meet market needs. The benefits of industrial blue laser material processing are leading to rapid adoption across a range of industries, necessitating, by necessity, changes in the supply chain; but as these changes occur, other blue laser applications will open up in other industries, such as healthcare, display, and bioinstrumentation.

With past history as an indicator, the growth promised by the blue laser seems almost inescapable. Additive manufacturing offers efficiency in the use of materials, rapid time to market for innovative designs in all sectors and significant net reductions in operating and maintenance costs. But these benefits cannot be realized if metal 3D printing remains expensive and slow. The industrial blue laser breaks down these barriers to deliver fast, cost-effective, high-quality manufacturing of metal parts, and enables additive manufacturing to deliver on its promise.

]]>
Scope of Facebook’s $90m privacy settlement challenged https://atlantic-storm.org/scope-of-facebooks-90m-privacy-settlement-challenged/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 19:53:00 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/scope-of-facebooks-90m-privacy-settlement-challenged/

The Meta logo is seen in this illustration taken August 22, 2022. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

  • Antitrust plaintiffs in separate case question ‘broad’ language
  • Hearing set for October 27

(Reuters) – A group of plaintiffs’ lawyers have raised questions about the scope of Meta Platform Inc’s pending $90 million privacy settlement in California federal court, telling a judge that their claims in a case separate antitrust should be separated and not brushed aside in the agreement.

Lawyers for Hagens Berman Sobol Shapiro and Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan said in a court filing on Monday that they fear broad language in the privacy settlement could be used to thwart antitrust claims pending before another judge in the Northern United States District Court in California.

Facebook attorneys in both cases did not immediately respond to messages seeking comment. A Facebook representative also did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Facebook has denied any responsibility in either case.

The privacy settlement would resolve allegations that Facebook tracks users’ web activity even after they log out of the social media website. In the antitrust case, Facebook is accused of exploiting user data to stifle competition. The case also concerns the company’s data collection practices.

The data privacy settlement announced in February “risks providing a benefit to common defendant Meta Platforms Inc that it did not bargain for and to which it is not entitled,” attorneys for the antitrust plaintiffs said in the filing. court on Monday.

Plaintiffs’ attorneys asked U.S. District Judge Edward Davila to include a sentence in the confidentiality agreement stating that the dispute resolution does not limit the claims alleged in the antitrust litigation.

On Tuesday, attorneys for the plaintiffs in the antitrust case and the data privacy plaintiffs did not immediately respond to messages seeking comment.

A hearing on the data privacy settlement is scheduled for October 27.

Lawyers for the antitrust plaintiffs said they were concerned about language in the confidentiality agreement that releases “all claims … whether known or unknown.” Lawyers argued in their filing that the alleged injuries in the two cases are “fundamentally different.”

Data privacy plaintiffs have sought damages for breach of privacy. The antitrust plaintiffs said they were seeking damages “based on the diminished compensation they received for their data due to Facebook’s destruction of competition.”

The case is In re Facebook Internet Tracking Litigation, US District Court for the Northern District of California, No. 5:12-md-02314.

For plaintiffs: David Straite of DiCello Levitt Gutzler; Stephen Grygiel of Grygiel Law; and Jay Barnes of Simmons Hanly Conroy

For Facebook: Michael Rhodes of Cooley

Read more:

Meta’s Facebook will pay $90 million to settle privacy lawsuit over user tracking

Facebook loses bid to deny user data privacy antitrust claims

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

]]>
The curious connection between cloud repatriation and SRE operations https://atlantic-storm.org/the-curious-connection-between-cloud-repatriation-and-sre-operations/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 11:30:21 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/the-curious-connection-between-cloud-repatriation-and-sre-operations/

I have a penchant for philosophy. I’m about three classes away from graduating, and every few years I tell myself that one day I’ll finish it. Thus, I know very well what is called in statistics – and in logic – a post hoc error, from which we derive the saying “correlation is not causation”. It is the logical error to assume that if event Y followed event X, event Y must have been caused by event X. The most famous call for this error came from Bobby Henderson , which illustrated the absurdity of assuming causation from the correlation with his chart showing that global warming has been caused by the decreasing number of pirates in the world. Yeah, that doesn’t make sense, but neither do a lot of graphs that people derive causality from. Just because two data points are mapped against each other doesn’t mean one caused the other. In many cases, it doesn’t even make sense to correlate the two. After all, pirates and global warming? Nobody takes this seriously. But it’s an important point to make as we delve into the question of the relationship between Site Reliability Engineering (SRE) operations and cloud repatriation.

To be clear, I’m not suggesting that adopting SRE practices results in cloud repatriation. But I suggest that there is a close and meaningful relationship between the two. The fact that Google, a cloud provider, created SRE as a practice is not a mistake. The model, mindset, and skills associated with SRE are integral to the successful operation of cloud infrastructure and services.

Cloud repatriation is real

The repatriation of the public cloud itself is a somewhat taboo subject in some circles. Consider the controversy raised by Andreessen Horowitz when he published “The Cost of the Cloud, A Trillion-Dollar Paradox” and suggested that companies were repatriating from the cloud and realizing significant savings in the process. Some would have you believe that this does not happen, but there is enough data and anecdotal evidence to indicate that yes, it does.

F5’s 2021 State of Application Strategy Report questioned the market about public cloud repatriation. Only 13% had apps backhauled and 14% planned to do so. A year later, that combined total has increased by 40 percentage points to 37% and 30%, respectively. This is not an anomaly, as several credible analyst firms report similar results. Interestingly, the repatriation rate is not globally universal. Both APCJ and LATAM are much less likely to repatriate than EMEA and NA.

I maintain that companies bring applications back from the public cloud, and the question is not “Are they?” but rather ‘How many workloads are they removing and where are they going?’ This is a question for the State of Application Strategy 2023 research.

For now, consider one possible catalyst for repatriation: SRE operations. Because even if the rising cost of the cloud is a driver of the desire to repatriate if you do not have the skills to operate as efficiently elsewhere – and therefore benefit from a lower cost – then why repatriate?

And we posit that it is the SRE operational practices and skills that enable enterprises to repatriate and maintain the efficiencies and cost savings needed to justify the decision whether to move these workloads to another public cloud, on site or on the outskirts.

Dig into the data

At first glance, there is a strong correlation between adoption and application of SRE practices and repatriation to the cloud, suggesting that organizations capable of operating in a cloud-like manner, i.e. that they have adopted SRE practices, effectively take back their toys (apps) and return home (on-site or elsewhere) because they can.

In other words, only 4% of organizations that have not adopted SRE practices have brought applications back from the public cloud. No less than 73% of those who adopted SRE practices also brought back applications.

Of course, adopting practices does not necessarily mean applying practices. So we looked at how organizations actually operate applications, systems, and infrastructure. Specifically, we looked at the percentage of their operations that use SRE practices. Perhaps unsurprisingly, this generated similar results.

Of those operating 0% of their applications, systems, and infrastructure using SRE practices, 81% do not inherit. Conversely, of those using SRE practices for 76% to 99% of applications, systems, and infrastructure operations, 54% have been repatriated. The point where repatriation seems to start gaining momentum is when organizations outgrow the use of SRE practices to operate more than a quarter (25%) of their applications, systems, and infrastructure.

Remember I noted that APCJ and LATAM were much less likely to repatriate? They are also much less likely to leverage SRE practices to leverage their applications, systems, and infrastructure. In fact, more than a quarter (26%) of LATAM and APCJ respondents (29%) were operating ZERO% of applications, systems and infrastructure using SRE practices. In the EMEA region? It’s only 5%. And in NA, even lower at 2%.

Significant relationship or curious coincidence?

There seems to be an indisputable correlation between organizations that adopt SRE as an operational practice and public cloud repatriation rates. But is it a meaningful relationship or just a curious coincidence?

I will argue that this is a meaningful relationship.

The practices and skills associated with SRE are well suited to operating a large-scale cloud environment. As I said before, it’s no mistake that it was Google that created SRE and literally wrote the book about it. The value of the cloud lies in its operational model, which can significantly reduce the cost per transaction, whether measured by HTTP exchanges or client sessions. This enables cost-effective scaling of digital applications and services.

Using automation and practices that tend to focus on significant incidents rather than non-disruptive events provides the cost-effective scale of people (and therefore their expertise) who are responsible for maintaining a high level of availability and performance.

Adopting and using SRE practices enables organizations to effectively scale their operations, whether in the public cloud, on-premises, or at the edge. And what the data tells us is that organizations seem to be using the capability to do just that.

]]>
Canceling Student Loan Debt May Come With a Tax Bill https://atlantic-storm.org/canceling-student-loan-debt-may-come-with-a-tax-bill/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 17:53:52 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/canceling-student-loan-debt-may-come-with-a-tax-bill/

Biden announced last month that he would forgive $10,000 in student loan debt for borrowers who earn less than $125,000 a year. He said 95% of borrowers, or around 43million people, would get the relief – but some will have to pay tax on it.

Video transcript

Cody HUNANIAN: We are very concerned that some borrowers may have their student debt canceled and be taxed.

JARED WALCACK: Right now, at least five states are in line to mandate this student loan debt forgiveness.

President Biden’s student loan forgiveness plan could erase thousands of debts for millions of borrowers across the country.

But depending on the state you live in, you may still have to pay tax day.

Cody HUNANIAN: Some states, especially those with more conservative leadership, told us they thought they would tax borrowers. And we also know that there are other states that think they’re not going to tax borrowers.

JARED WALCACK: Indeed, historically, at both the federal and state levels, any form of debt relief or cancellation is effectively taxable income.

Cody HUNANIAN: The federal government will not impose this relief. Lawmakers, led by Senator Schumer and others, passed a bill during the pandemic to ensure the federal government never taxes student debt that has been canceled by 2025.

JARED WALCACK: Some states follow this. In fact, most do. But there are a handful of states that don’t fully comply with the federal code or comply with this provision. And therefore, they are going to impose the release of student debt.

I also don’t think many states want to tax this particular type of debt cancellation. Most of them already comply in a way that they won’t. But for those remaining states, we’ll have to see if there’s some sort of fix in the works. But if you’re a borrower and you get $10,000 or $20,000 in loan relief, you’re probably very happy with it even if you have to pay $500 or $1,000.

Joe Biden: If you earn less than $125,000, you get $10,000 off your student debt. If you earn less than $125,000 a year and received a Pell Grant, you’ll get an additional $10,000 of that total, for a total relief of $20,000. 95% of borrowers can benefit from these actions.

Cody HUNANIAN: We have achieved a great victory in canceling the federal student debt thanks to the action of the President. And if we have to focus on state governments trying to avoid unnecessary taxes, so will we. The fight goes on. This victory is just the beginning of so many other problems that we will continue to solve.

]]>
J&J Reaches $205 Million Settlement in Australian Pelvic Mesh Class Action https://atlantic-storm.org/jj-reaches-205-million-settlement-in-australian-pelvic-mesh-class-action/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 06:24:00 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/jj-reaches-205-million-settlement-in-australian-pelvic-mesh-class-action/

The Johnson & Johnson logo is displayed on a screen on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., May 29, 2019. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Sep 12 (Reuters) – Johnson & Johnson has reached a 300 million Australian dollar ($204.90 million) settlement in two Australian class action lawsuits filed by Shine Lawyers for selling faulty pelvic mesh implants to Australian women, the law firm said on Monday.

The settlement, which Shine Lawyers said was the largest product liability class action settlement in Australian history, follows multiple legal proceedings involving more than 11,000 claimants, the pharmaceutical giant and its Ethicon subsidiary.

A federal court judge previously found that Ethicon sold implants to treat urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse without warning women and surgeons of the risks, and rushed the products to market before proper testing . Read more

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

The company was ordered to pay $1.7 million to three Australian women in March 2020.

A second class action lawsuit was subsequently filed by Shine Lawyers in April 2021 on behalf of women who received their implants on or after July 4, 2017 and were ineligible to join the first class action, with claims similar to the first.

“The settlement reached on September 9, 2022 is the largest product liability class action settlement in Australian history and is subject to Federal Court approval,” Shine Lawyers said in a statement.

A Johnson & Johnson spokesperson said, “Ethicon sympathizes with all women who experience medical complications related to pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence.”

J&J has faced similar lawsuits over its pelvic mesh products in the United States, Canada and Europe.

($1 = 1.4641 Australian dollars)

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Reporting by Jaskiran Singh in Bengaluru, additional reporting by Sonali Paul in Melbourne; edited by Uttaresh.V

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

]]>
29 Rohingyas charged https://atlantic-storm.org/29-rohingyas-charged/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 18:51:00 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/29-rohingyas-charged/

Mohib Ullah

A court in Cox’s Bazar on Sunday charged 29 Rohingya, including suspected members of the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army, with the murder of Rohingya leader Mohib Ullah at Cox’s Bazar camp in 2021.

Cox’s Bazar District and Sessions Judge Mohammad Ismail also set October 11 as the official opening of the trial with the taking of evidence from prosecution witnesses.

Attorney General Faridul Alam said the prosecution named 38 people as witnesses in the case.

The 29 defendants are Mohammad Salim, Shaukat Ulla, Mohammad Salam, Ziaur Rahman, Md Elias, Md Azizul Haque, Morshed alias Murshid, Nur Mohammad, Anas, Nazim Uddin, Abul Kalam alias Abu, Hamid Hossain, Sirajul Mostafa alias Sirajullah alias Siraj, Moulavi Md Zakoria, Khairul Amin, Master Abdur Rahim alias Rakim, Zahid Hossain alias Lalu, Faiz Ullah, Samir Uddin alias Sami Uddin alias Nur Kamal, Saleh Ahmad, Mozammel alias Lal Badia, Tofail, Master Shafi Alam, Abdus Salam alias Zaker Murabbi, Zokir, Hafez Ayach, Master Kashim, Master Shukkur Alam and Mostafa Kamal.

Of the 29 defendants, 15 appeared in court when the charges were formulated while the other 14 were still in hiding.

On September 29, 2021, Mohib Ullah, president of the Arakan Rohingya Society for Peace and Human Rights, was shot dead by a group of armed people in his office in Lambasia camp in Ukhiya.

Mohib Ullah’s younger brother, Habib Ullah, filed a murder complaint the following day.

Known as a master among the Rohingyas, Mohib Ullah was one of the main campaigners for their repatriation to Myanmar.

Mohib Ullah rose to prominence as a leader after organizing a large assembly of Rohingyas on August 25, 2019, on the second anniversary of the start of the Rohingya exodus to Bangladesh from Rakhine State in Myanmar. .

He traveled to Geneva in 2019 to address the United Nations Human Rights Council on the plight of the Rohingya.

His murder sparked a wave of violence in the Rohingya camp.

The murder case investigator and Ukhiya Police Inspector (investigating) Gazi Salauddin filed the charges against the 29 Rohingya in the case on June 13, 2022.

Police said earlier that a total of 36 people had been found involved at various stages of the murder, adding that seven people had yet to be identified.

According to the indictment, seven of the arrested Rohingya confessed to their involvement in the murder of Mohib Ullah.

The indictment says all the defendants are Rohingya and suspected members of an armed gang.

Mohib Ullah’s family and the Rohingya blamed ARSA for the killing.

Bangladesh does not officially recognize the presence of ARSA on its soil.

According to the charges, an arrested defendant called Mohib Ullah at the ARSPH office to discuss Rohingya repatriation issues and informed other members of the armed gang who shot him dead.

According to the charges, armed groups were harmed by Mohib Ullah’s leadership and popularity and assassinated him to take over the camps.

Mohib Ullah’s family was resettled to Canada in April amid growing concerns for his safety in the refugee camp.

]]>
Top US Commander Sounds Alarm on Islamic State Prison Camps in Syria https://atlantic-storm.org/top-us-commander-sounds-alarm-on-islamic-state-prison-camps-in-syria/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 06:05:00 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/top-us-commander-sounds-alarm-on-islamic-state-prison-camps-in-syria/

The commander of all US military forces in the Middle East issued an urgent appeal to the international community after visiting the al-Hol camp for Islamic State detainees in northeast Syria on Friday.

Describing al-Hol as a “humanitarian disaster” and a “hotbed of human suffering”, US Army General Michael “Erik” Kurilla urged governments around the world to repatriate their citizens from the camp “and rehabilitate them if necessary”.

More than 90% of al-Hol detainees are women and children, 70% of whom are under the age of 12, Kurilla noted in a statement after his visit on Friday. Most do not have sufficient access to running water and other basic necessities for life.

“ISIS seeks to exploit these horrific conditions. With around 80 births in the camp each month, this place is a literal breeding ground for the next generation of IS,” Kurilla said.

Why is this important: The four-star general’s visit marked the first time a US official has entered al-Hol camp and spoken to detainees, a military official told Al-Monitor.

Kurilla had already stopped at the camp in April during his first tour of the Middle East as commander of CENTCOM. US Senator Lindsey Graham (R-GA) also visited the camp in July, although that trip was not coordinated with Kurilla’s trips, the official said.

The general was accompanied on Friday by the commander of the Kurdish-led Syrian forces, Mazlum Kobane. Other members of the US government were also present, according to a source well placed on the ground in Syria.

Al-Hol is the largest of more than a dozen makeshift facilities holding IS detainees in the Kurdish-controlled northeast of the country. Some 56,000 suspected family members of IS fighters continue to languish at the site more than three years after Kurdish-led US and Syrian forces defeated the jihadist group on the battlefield in 2019.

The majority of those in al-Hol were sent there following the mass surrenders of IS fighters and their families as a last resort during the battle for Baghouz, Syria, in March 2019.

“Most camp residents reject IS,” Kurilla said after meeting with inmates and camp security officials. “Many want to contribute to society. Many wish to return to their country of origin, re-enter the labor market and send their children back to school,” the commander said.

“There are women and children who can be reintegrated into society. They can and want to be productive,” he said, acknowledging that those he spoke to arrived in 2017, before the influx of prisoners in 2019.

Race against time: The CENTCOM chief’s moral plea comes as US defense officials continue to say ISIS is down, but not out.

In January, the jihadist group launched a bloody assault on the main detention center holding captured fighters in the town of Hasakah. The resulting battle left hundreds dead, including at least 300 Syrian-led forces.

The group continues to recruit from the population of al-Hol and likely plans attacks on other facilities that hold their fellow jihadists.

“ISIS views the detention centers where its fighters are housed as the population to replenish its army,” Dana Stroul, the Pentagon’s senior Middle East policy official, said at an event in Washington in July. .

“He sees al-Hol and al-Raj, and the youths in those camps, as the next generation of ISIS,” Stroul said.

Without US funding and the promise of military support, officials say the Kurdish-led guard force that runs the makeshift prisons would not be up to the task. Although some receive American training, the guards operate without American supervision. They are also underpaid, which exposes them to corruption, the Defense Intelligence Agency reported in June.

A series of killings and even beheadings of camp residents allegedly carried out by a network of IS operatives known as hisba have been discovered by security forces in al-Hol in recent years.

The violence in the camp has also driven out aid workers. The Norwegian Refugee Council temporarily abandoned most of its humanitarian work in al-Hol earlier this year “following an armed raid and beatings of its staff”, the US-led coalition United Told a Pentagon inspector general in June. The coalition did not specify who was responsible for these incidents.

Over the past two weeks in al-Hol, Syrian Kurdish-led forces said they arrested “hundreds” of IS members in US-coordinated raids on the camp’s maze of disparate tents.

US Central Command said the Kurdish-led operation rounded up “dozens” of ISIS operatives and disrupted an important “ISIS facilitation network, both in the camp and throughout the Syria”.

Four women bearing signs of torture were also found chained in tunnels at the camp earlier this week, CENTCOM said in a statement. At least one member of the local Syrian security forces was killed in an exchange of fire with IS in al-Hol on Thursday.

The latest sweep follows the arrest of some 130 suspected ISIS members in al-Hol between May and June this year, the US-led coalition reported in June.

Repatriation net: Kurilla on Friday praised Baghdad’s recent efforts to repatriate its citizens, noting that about half of the camp’s detainees are from Iraq.

The Iraqi government has brought back nearly 2,500 citizens from the camp since last year, including 683 people (including 203 children) as of June, according to the Inspector General’s latest report. Detainees have also been returned to Kosovo, Russia and other European countries in recent months.

“There is a need to accelerate this progress,” Kurilla said in the statement. “If Iraq repatriated, rehabilitated and reintegrated its citizens, the problem would immediately become much more manageable.”

Around a third of the camp’s residents are thought to be from Syria, posing an even bigger problem for the international repatriation effort. International law prohibits returning prisoners to governments that may violate their basic human rights.

And after: In the long term, US officials see repatriation as the only viable solution to the problem of IS detainees. The State Department is leading this effort, but it is unlikely to be resolved in the next two or three years.

For this reason, Pentagon and State Department officials have worked with congressional lawmakers to increase funding for the construction of new “purpose-built” facilities to hold ISIS detainees in more secure settings. and more human.

The US-led coalition brought in a new commander, Major General Matthew McFarlane, at a ceremony in Baghdad on Thursday.

Know more: Pentagon officials warn that Turkey’s stated plans to invade northeastern Syria and attack Kurdish-led forces will almost certainly bring IS jihadists out of their prisons.

Read Jared Szuba’s report here.

]]>
Research: Rating Action: Moody’s raises issuer rating of Sweetwater Union HSD (CA) to A2 and GO to A1; outlook is stable https://atlantic-storm.org/research-rating-action-moodys-raises-issuer-rating-of-sweetwater-union-hsd-ca-to-a2-and-go-to-a1-outlook-is-stable/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 00:20:12 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/research-rating-action-moodys-raises-issuer-rating-of-sweetwater-union-hsd-ca-to-a2-and-go-to-a1-outlook-is-stable/
No related data.

© 2022 Moody’s Corporation, Moody’s Investors Service, Inc., Moody’s Analytics, Inc. and/or their licensors and affiliates (collectively, “MOODY’S”). All rights reserved.

THE CREDIT RATINGS ISSUED BY MOODY’S CREDIT RATINGS AFFILIATES CONSTITUTE THEIR CURRENT OPINIONS ON THE RELATIVE FUTURE CREDIT RISK OF THE ENTITIES, CREDIT COMMITMENTS OR INDEBTEDNESS OR SECURITIES ASSOCIATED WITH INDEBTEDNESS, AND THE MATERIALS, PRODUCTS, SERVICES AND INFORMATION PUBLISHED BY MOODY’S (COLLECTIVELY, THE “PUBLICATIONS”) MAY INCLUDE SUCH CURRENT OPINIONS. MOODY’S DEFINES CREDIT RISK AS THE RISK THAT AN ENTITY FAILURE TO MEET ITS CONTRACTUAL FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS WHEN DUE AND ANY ESTIMATED FINANCIAL LOSSES IN CASE OF DEFAULT OR IMPAIRMENT. SEE THE APPLICABLE PUBLICATION OF MOODY’S RATINGS SYMBOLS AND DEFINITIONS FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE TYPES OF CONTRACTUAL FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS COVERED BY MOODY’S CREDIT RATINGS. THE CREDIT RATINGS DO NOT ADDRESS ANY OTHER RISKS, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO: LIQUIDITY RISK, MARKET VALUE RISK OR PRICE VOLATILITY. CREDIT RATINGS, NON-CREDIT RATINGS (“RATINGS”) AND OTHER OPINIONS INCLUDED IN MOODY’S PUBLICATIONS ARE NOT STATEMENTS OF CURRENT OR HISTORICAL FACTS. MOODY’S PUBLICATIONS MAY ALSO INCLUDE MODEL-BASED QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATES OF CREDIT RISK AND RELATED OPINIONS OR COMMENTARY PUBLISHED BY MOODY’S ANALYTICS, INC. AND/OR ITS AFFILIATES. MOODY’S CREDIT RATINGS, RATINGS, OTHER OPINIONS AND PUBLICATIONS DO NOT CONSTITUTE OR PROVIDE INVESTMENT OR FINANCIAL ADVICE, AND MOODY’S CREDIT RATINGS, RATINGS, OTHER OPINIONS AND PUBLICATIONS ARE AND DO NOT PROVIDE ANY RECOMMENDATION TO BUY, SELL OR HOLD PARTICULAR SECURITIES. MOODY’S CREDIT RATINGS, RATINGS, OTHER OPINIONS AND PUBLICATIONS DO NOT COMMENT ON THE SUITABILITY OF ANY INVESTMENT FOR ANY PARTICULAR INVESTOR. MOODY’S ISSUES ITS CREDIT RATINGS, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER OPINIONS AND PUBLISHES ITS PUBLICATIONS WITH THE CARE AND UNDERSTANDING THAT EACH INVESTOR WILL CAREFULLY MAKE HIS OWN RESEARCH AND EVALUATION OF EACH SECURITY THAT IS CONSIDERED FOR PURCHASE, HOLDING OR SALE.

MOODY’S CREDIT RATINGS, RATINGS, OTHER OPINIONS AND PUBLICATIONS ARE NOT INTENDED FOR USE BY RETAIL INVESTORS AND IT WOULD BE UNINTENDED AND INAPPROPRIATE FOR RETAIL INVESTORS TO USE ANY CREDIT RATINGS, RATINGS, OTHER OPINIONS OR PUBLICATIONS OF MOODY’S WHEN MAKING AN INVESTMENT DECISION. IF IN DOUBT, YOU SHOULD CONTACT YOUR FINANCIAL ADVISOR OR OTHER PROFESSIONAL.

ALL INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN IS PROTECTED BY LAW, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO COPYRIGHT LAW, AND NONE OF SUCH INFORMATION MAY NOT BE COPIED OR OTHERWISE REPRODUCED, RECONDITIONED, TRANSMITTED, TRANSFERRED, DISTRIBUTED , REDISTRIBUTED OR RESOLD, OR STORED FOR FUTURE USE FOR ANY SUCH PURPOSE, IN WHOLE OR IN PART, IN ANY FORM OR MANNER, OR BY ANY MEANS, BY ANY PERSON WITHOUT THE PRIOR WRITTEN CONSENT OF MOODY’S .

MOODY’S CREDIT RATINGS, RATINGS, OTHER OPINIONS AND PUBLICATIONS ARE NOT INTENDED FOR USE BY ANYONE AS A REFERENCE AS THIS TERM IS DEFINED FOR REGULATORY PURPOSES AND SHOULD NOT BE USED IN A MANNER THAT COULD CONSIDER AS A REFERENCE.

All information contained herein is obtained by MOODY’S from sources believed to be accurate and reliable. However, due to the possibility of human or mechanical error and other factors, all information contained herein is provided “AS IS” without warranty of any kind. MOODY’S takes all necessary measures to ensure that the information it uses to assign a credit rating is of sufficient quality and comes from sources that MOODY’S considers to be reliable including, where applicable, independent third-party sources. However, MOODY’S is not an auditor and cannot in any case independently verify or validate the information received as part of the rating process or the preparation of its Publications.

To the extent permitted by law, MOODY’S and its directors, officers, employees, agents, representatives, licensors and suppliers disclaim all liability to any person or entity for any indirect, special, consequential or incidental loss or damage whatsoever , arising out of or relating to the information contained herein or the use or inability to use such information, even if MOODY’S or any of its directors, officers, employees, agents, representatives, licensors or suppliers is informed in advance of the possibility of such loss or damage, including but not limited to: (a) any loss of actual or potential profits or (b) any loss or damage occurring when the financial instrument concerned does not not subject to a particular credit rating assigned by MOODY’S.

To the extent permitted by law, MOODY’S and its directors, officers, employees, agents, representatives, licensors and suppliers disclaim all liability for any direct or compensatory loss or damage to any person or entity, including but not limited to limit, any negligence (but excluding fraud, willful misconduct or any other type of liability which, for the avoidance of doubt, cannot be excluded by law) on the part of, or any contingency within the control or beyond the control of MOODY’S or any of its directors, officers, employees, agents, representatives, licensors or suppliers, arising out of or in connection with the information contained herein or the use or inability to use this information.

NO WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AS TO THE ACCURACY, TIMELINESS, COMPLETENESS, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OF ANY CREDIT RATINGS, RATINGS, OTHER OPINIONS OR INFORMATION ARE GIVEN OR MADE BY MOODY’S IN ANY FORM OR MANNER.

Moody’s Investors Service, Inc., a credit rating agency wholly owned subsidiary of Moody’s Corporation (“MCO”), hereby discloses that most issuers of debt securities (including corporate and municipal bonds, debentures, notes and commercial paper) and preferred shares rated by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. have, prior to the assignment of any credit rating, agreed to pay Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. for rating opinions credit and the services it renders fees ranging from $1,000 to approximately $5,000,000. MCO and Moody’s Investors Service also maintain policies and procedures to ensure the independence of credit ratings and Moody’s Investors Service credit rating processes. Information regarding certain affiliations that may exist between MCO directors and rated entities, and between entities that hold credit ratings from Moody’s Investors Service and that have also publicly disclosed to the SEC an ownership interest in MCO of more than 5% , are published annually on www .moodys.com under the heading “Investor Relations — Corporate Governance — Director and Shareholder Affiliation Policy”.

Additional Terms for Australia Only: Any publication in Australia of this document is in accordance with the Australian Financial Services License of MOODY’S subsidiary, Moody’s Investors Service Pty Limited ABN 61 003 399 657AFSL 336969 and/or Moody’s Analytics Australia Pty Ltd ABN 94 105 136 972 AFSL 383569 (if applicable). This document is intended for supply only to “wholesale customers” within the meaning of section 761G of the Corporations Act 2001. By continuing to access this document from Australia, you represent to MOODY’S that you are, or are accessing to the document as a representative of a “wholesale customer” and that neither you nor the entity you represent will directly or indirectly distribute this document or its contents to “retail customers” within the meaning of section 761G of the Corporations Act 2001. MOODY’S credit rating is an opinion of the creditworthiness of a debt security of the issuer, and not of the equity securities of the issuer or any form of security available to investors in detail.

Additional Terms for Japan Only: Moody’s Japan KK (“MJKK”) is a wholly owned subsidiary credit rating agency of Moody’s Group Japan GK, which is wholly owned by Moody’s Overseas Holdings Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of MCO. Moody’s SF Japan KK (“MSFJ”) is a wholly owned subsidiary credit rating agency of MJKK. MSFJ is not a Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organization (“NRSRO”). Accordingly, the credit ratings assigned by MSFJ are non-NRSRO credit ratings. Non-NRSRO credit ratings are assigned by an entity that is not an NRSRO and therefore the rated obligation will not qualify for certain types of treatment under US law. MJKK and MSFJ are credit rating agencies registered with the Japan Financial Services Agency and their registration numbers are FSA Commissioner (Ratings) No. 2 and 3 respectively.

MJKK or MSFJ (as applicable) hereby disclose that most issuers of debt securities (including corporate and municipal bonds, debentures, notes and commercial paper) and preferred stocks rated by MJKK or MSFJ (as applicable) have, prior to the assignment of any credit rating, agreed to pay MJKK or MSFJ (as applicable) for credit rating opinions and the services it renders a fee ranging from 100 000 JPY to around 550,000,000 JPY.

MJKK and MSFJ also maintain policies and procedures to meet Japanese regulatory requirements.

]]>
China also vexes Indonesia with nine-dash claim in Jakarta’s EEZ https://atlantic-storm.org/china-also-vexes-indonesia-with-nine-dash-claim-in-jakartas-eez/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 15:29:55 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/china-also-vexes-indonesia-with-nine-dash-claim-in-jakartas-eez/

first word

It is not just tradition, closeness and kinship that make Indonesia the first choice of Philippine presidents when they undertake their first state visits after assuming power. Equally important is the shared experience of hurt, great and small.

President Ferdinand Marcos Jr.’s state visit to Indonesia would have been more productive and promising for the future had the Department of Foreign Affairs (FDFA) been briefed enough to brief the President on Indonesia’s similar issues with the China’s baffling assertion of historical rights (courtesy of its Nine-Dash Fantasy) in Indonesia’s Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) in the Natuna Islands.

Like us, Indonesia also has a history of wrangling with Beijing over its rights in its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (Unclos).

The one-on-one talks between Presidents Widodo and Marcos would have been geared towards the current issues of the moment for the two countries, and further discuss ways in which the two countries could join Vietnam and Malaysia in a concerted effort to protect their EEZs and galvanize support for their cause within the international community.

Get the latest news


delivered to your inbox

Sign up for the Manila Times daily newsletters

By registering with an email address, I acknowledge that I have read and accept the terms of use and the privacy policy.

According to published reports of the state visit, the discussion barely touched on the mutuality of interests in the dispute over the South China Sea and Indonesia’s offshore energy development projects.

Indonesia is an invaluable discussion partner for the Philippines due to its discoveries of oil and gas deposits in its EEZ and territorial waters.

While the Philippines has so far found nothing but Chinese bullying in our Western Philippine Sea EEZ, Indonesia is actively exploring and developing its energy resources in partnership with major international energy companies in its Natuna Islands EEZ. Jakarta has announced its intention to transform the region into a special economic zone.

China badgers with a nine-dash line

In its September 2 issue, the Asia Times published a report on Indonesia’s offshore oil and gas development program in partnership with Western energy companies. John Mcbeth’s report, “China spiking Indonesia’s offshore oil and gas risk”, tells the story between Indonesia and China on the issue of rights.

I quote the report at length because of its natural interest to the Philippine government and the Filipino public.

“After unilaterally expanding its territorial claims in Indonesia’s exclusive economic zone, China has yet to respond to British oil company Harbor Energy PLC’s plans to pipe newly discovered natural gas from its Tuna block through the maritime border to Vietnam’s offshore network.

“Harbour discovered the Tuna field in 2014 and was in the process of drilling two appraisal wells in July 2021 when a Chinese Coast Guard vessel approached the semi-submersible platform leased by the company and took it said to cease operations.

“That and a subsequent message from the Chinese Foreign Ministry was the first time Jakarta realized that Beijing intended to enforce its vague nine-dash line of claimed territorial sovereignty – similarly it did. has already done with Vietnam and the Philippines — in Indonesian waters.

“Over the next seven weeks, the Chinese research vessel Haiyang Dizhi 10 and two coastguards carried out an extensive survey of the seabed around the platform in a clear attempt to intimidate – and although they were followed by a fleet of Indonesian Navy corvettes with orders not to interfere.

“The Indonesian government made no official protest but instead announced its intention to transform the Natuna North Sea into a special economic zone with tax breaks to attract foreign investment and the construction of new military installations on the main island. by Natuna Bezar.

“Harbour and Russian state-owned JSC Zarubezhneft have an equal 50% stake in the Tuna block, which contains 100 million barrels of oil equivalent per day, or 55% gas and 45% liquids, according to the latest company reports.

“Harbour says it is on track to submit a development plan later this year with a final investment decision expected by the end of 2023. But none of its reports specifically mentioned the geopolitical risks surrounding the project.

“In 2017, Harbor signed a memorandum of understanding with PetroVietnam to deliver the gas 70 kilometers to the existing 325 kilometer long Nam Con Song pipeline network off the southeast coast of Vietnam.

“Zarubezneft has a 33% stake in the network, which it bought last year from fellow company Rosneft. When it opened in 2014, the $1.3 billion pipeline was designed to transport imported gas neighboring countries.

“Analysts believe Russia’s involvement in the project could give China pause given the growing relationship between Moscow and Beijing in the wake of the war in Ukraine and the movement of carrier battle groups from the US 7th Fleet in the South China Sea.

“Apart from an isolated incident about a month ago when Indonesian and Chinese warships exchanged petulant radio messages, there have been few recent incidents around Tuna in the far north of the EEZ. Indonesian.

“Last November, Chinese President Xi Jinping sought to reassure Southeast Asian leaders at a special summit in Beijing that China had no intention of bullying its smaller neighbors. despite its role in stoking tensions in the region.

“China was, is and always will be the good neighbor, good friend and good partner of ASEAN,” Xi said. “China will never seek hegemony, much less bully small countries.”

“Xi’s remarks came just a week after Chinese Coast Guard vessels intercepted and fired high-pressure water cannons at boats carrying supplies to Philippine military outposts in the northeastern part of the Philippines. Disputed Spratly Islands.

“Harbour already has a 28.67% operating interest in Natuna Sea Block A, with seven producing fields located approximately 300 kilometers southwest of Tuna which have supplied gas to Singapore via the West Natuna transmission system of 640 kilometers since 2001.

“Meanwhile, with most of the major oil majors either gone or heading for exit, Harbor and Spanish oil company Repsol are leading the search for what experts say is Indonesia’s biggest offshore gas find in two years. decades…”

The Hague Arbitration

The Philippines’ exploration and development of possible energy resources in its EEZ of the Western Philippine Sea has been visibly retarded by former President Rodrigo Duterte’s policy of bowing down to Beijing and just watching China build aggressively structures and dominate fishing in the South China Sea. . There has been a persistent effort by Beijing to rebuff any attempt by Manila to initiate and implement projects in the latter’s EEZ. It has been deleterious that there is a segment of the Filipino media that champions the Chinese agenda and seeks to stifle even publicity about the 2016 Hague arbitration award that favored the Filipino cause and dismissed China’s claim. historic rights in disputed waters.

Indonesia and Vietnam generally did better than the Philippines in fending off Chinese tactics. Indonesia even went so far as to blow up Chinese fishing vessels attempting to poach in the waters around the Natuna Islands. Vietnam and China clashed over the Paracel Islands in 1974.

To the credit of the Philippines, we have taken the dispute to court for arbitration in The Hague.

In January 2013, the Philippines initiated arbitration proceedings against China under Unclos over a range of issues, including the latter’s historical rights claims inside the nine-dash line. A tribunal of arbitrators constituted under Annex VII of Unclos appointed the Permanent Court of Arbitration as the registry of the proceedings.

On July 12, 2016, the tribunal ruled in favor of the Philippines on most of its findings. While it “would not rule on any question of sovereignty over land territory or delimit any maritime boundary between the Parties”, it concluded that China had not historically exercised exclusive control over the waters inside the nine-dash line and had “no legal right”. base” to claim “historic rights” to the resources there. It also concluded that China’s historical rights claims to maritime areas (as opposed to land masses and territorial waters) within the nine-dash line would have no lawful effect beyond that to what she is entitled to under Unclos. Predictably, China rejected the decision, calling it “ill-founded”.

The Chinese nine-dash mantra thus turned out to be an empty bag. It can’t hold. Only former President Duterte was deceived.


[email protected]

]]>
Stop scaring children https://atlantic-storm.org/stop-scaring-children/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 05:02:37 +0000 https://atlantic-storm.org/stop-scaring-children/

How long will it be before someone writes a book about all the “C’s” that are currently invading our collective consciousness?

Cost of life; climate change; COP26; cryptocurrency and coercion towards control. Maybe even corruption or conspiracy theories? Don’t forget Covid!

The fear is palpable again. But there is nothing new here!

In 1982, in my third year of high school, apparently peak oil had been reached and we were told, “The oil is running out! Demand is growing exponentially and supply is decreasing…it’s a crisis, an oil crisis!

It was terrifying for a 15-year-old boy who was suddenly told that world oil was about to run out in the next few years and it was potentially the end of the world.

Combine that with the Falklands War and high inflation, and it doesn’t take a genius to draw meaningful parallels with today’s world.

Pass more than 40 years and the oil is not exhausted. We even argue that much of what’s left should be left in the ground – and it probably is.

We have an alternative path – a better path, a sustainable, cleaner and more scalable path.

And we should take it.

But this time, let’s not take it because we’re told we’re in crisis; let’s do it instead because it’s a better option and it makes sense.

Let’s put climate change aside for a moment. Let’s remove the stick and consider the carrot.

How much energy do we actually use on earth? Google has many answers, but the range it currently offers is around 20 terawatts (TW). That’s a lot of zeros (13 to be precise).

But how much sunlight reaches the earth from the sun? Well, that’s a lot too. It’s actually 10,000x what we’re currently using. This energy from the sun can be captured using solar panels. Yields of 2% in the 1950s have risen to 20% and more by 2022, and panels currently in development are reaching 50% efficiency.

You do the math.

The sun also determines the weather and the wind can drive wind turbines. The bigger they are, the more efficient they are, and with 70% of the planet covered in ocean, we have the perfect locations to accommodate these massive machines.

“But,” I hear you say, “it’s only electricity!” It is useless for airplanes, trucks, container ships, etc.

No, but with the glut of electricity that our planet would be able to supply, we can produce green hydrogen, and from that we can make energy-dense synthetic liquid fuels.

Call me an optimist; but I believe it is the only sane and objective approach.

Surely we don’t have to scare the kids every time we want something to change, do we?

Instead, let’s focus on a few positive “C’s” that can actually make things better: our children.

Martin Worth is a director at PIM Ltd.

recommended for you

Russia-induced crisis exposes UK’s energy madhouse

]]>